Multi- Layering

Detail-orientated layering is playful and fun. Striking cleanness and very structured lines give off definition. You can add dimensions to your outfit through layering with zippers and high collars. The more you work with adding layers, the more transformational your outfit evolves, depending how dramatic you utilize them.

Yohji Yamamoto, a known Japanese designer, is all about building with fabrics and textiles. He utilizes various materials to intensify the layering effect. Reconstructed Elizabethan-esq collars by Rad Hourani add a distinctive element to the rest of the outfit. The Katie Eary collection is a perfect example of a high street wear. The urban hoodie is given versatility under a black, leather accentuated overcoat. The abstract floral patterns and bold colours brings about a youthful lifestyle. Lastly, the Carpe D’or collection brings a dark, mysterious edge utilizing mesh, scarves, rope and various textiles for his multi-layering style. Strong Japanese influences come out in this street samurai look, with Egyptian motifs visible in the hand accessories.

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Two Tone Layering

The balancing of colour coordination is key to layering. Two-tone can be used to flatter any outfit, it’s easy on the eye, both modern and functional. Think of yin and yang to construct your daily styling philosophy. Multi zippering doesn’t have to be edgy or biker styled. Rad Hourani exemplifies a criss cross balance for two-tone (black and white) layering, simplified in detail. Emperor high neck lines, clean zipper lines and overlapping layering all add to this haute couture warrior vibe.

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Accessories, Zippers, Draping and Weave Layering
For a more highly-evolved fashionista/fashionisto with the co-ordinated eye, here we see other advanced ways to layering and detail orientated examples to work with. Yamamato’s line features a high-end cowl neck hoodie under a trench overcoat swag. We like the buttoned wool overcoat pairing with the draping high-neck long-sleeve. Hourani showcases structured, clean, multi-zipper layering with two-tone leather pairing. We really like the accessorizing of the harness belt featured on the silky polyester jacket over the high-pointed neckline. The Japanese-influenced kimono-styled wrap piece with leather lined zipper really catches the eye under the leather jacket. Again we see high necklines and emperor style played out in Hourani’s collection.

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Draping and weaving techniques can manifest in unique and diverse ways. Here we see overcoats under-layering with subtle, clean zipper lining. For a more feminine look, an unique flowering effect occurs when you unzip the layers, like petals blossoming. For more masculine appeal, you can create geometric angled lines by working with zippers. In my perspective, my favourite advanced way of layering is weaving, which is unisex and can work for both the masculine and feminine look. For someone who’s more of a risk-taker, this weaving technique can evolve your sense of style, if done correctly.

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Meet the Designers

This blog features Yohji Yamamoto from Japan, Katy Eary from United States of America, Rad Hourani from Montreal and local designer Carpe D’or from Toronto!


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Spoke N’ Heard does not reserve rights to any of these images. They are the intellectual property of the photographer and the designer’s respective lines.

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